Holocaust

In May 1940, there were around 140,000 Jews living in the Netherlands. As the year wore on, increasingly severe anti-Jewish regulations were imposed by the German regime. Eventually, over 100,000 Jewish men, women and children were transported to concentration camps such as Auschwitz and Sobibor and murdered.

Deportations

Razzia op joden op het Jonas Daniël Meyerplein. Amsterdam, 1941

Razzia op joden op het Jonas Daniël Meyerplein. Amsterdam, 1941

Concentration camp jacket worn by Isabel Wachenheimer. Germany?, 1938-1945. Isabel Wachenheimer (1928-2010), a German Jew, was deported from Amsterdam to Westerbork camp. From there she was sent to Theresienstadt, and then to Auschwitz. On 5 May 1945, she was liberated in the adjacent camp, Mauthausen.

Concentration camp jacket worn by Isabel Wachenheimer. Germany?, 1938-1945. Isabel Wachenheimer (1928-2010), a German Jew, was deported from Amsterdam to Westerbork camp. From there she was sent to Theresienstadt, and then to Auschwitz. On 5 May 1945, she was liberated in the adjacent camp, Mauthausen.

Isolation, deportation, murder. That was the fate that awaited most of the Jewish population under the German occupation. Signs that read ‘Jews Prohibited’ appeared at entrances to cafés, theatres, parks and other public places. Jews were dismissed from government jobs and their children were sent home from school. From May 1942, all Jews were required to wear a yellow six-pointed star on their outer garment. In the summer of that year, the deportations began. Those who could find nowhere to hide did not stand a change. Through to September 1944, around 107,000 Jews were transported by train via Westerbork camp to concentration camps in Eastern Europe. Few survived the camps.